Benefits of a Wildlife friendly and pollinator garden…

My little meadow

I live in a new community development in the country side and unfortunately parts of the area surrounding me have been clear cut of many trees. While my particular plot was meadow and field, others were forested. Luckily portions of the land are protected wetlands and as such could not be touched. The areas that were cleared? Well…that was absolutely devastating to see/watch.The damage done was a lot more than I had ever imagined. This spurred me into action as I noticed a lot of the wildlife were now being displaced.

My husband and I have different opinions on landscaping and as such we came to a compromise. He would claim the front and north side of the property and I would have the back and south side. He gets his manicured lawn and I get my farm, meadow and wildlife sanctuary. However, I still have a few wildlife features in his areas such as a large berm with sunflowers, bird houses and native plants and it is a hub of activity with birds.


CANADIAN WILDLIFE FEDERATION

Be kind to the environment and our wildlife.


Last year I got my property (and garden) certified as a Wildlife Friendly Habitat with the Canadian Wildlife Federation. It was a matter of implementing the rules and guidelines set out on their website and then applying online for approval by filling out an application. The whole process was fairly simple.

A few weeks later I got my approval and a certificate in the mail which I proudly display on my front post sign for all to see. My husband says that the rules for wildlife are the ONLY rules I’ve ever followed! Heehee I must admit I am known as a rule breaker BUT when it comes to the environment and wildlife I don’t mess around. This is the only planet and life we get so making it a better place for all beings is high on my priority list.

Below are a few of the flowers and insects that can be found in my garden. All the flowers are native to North America or Canada and therefore are drought tolerant, hardy and a great food source for the wildlife.


Bachelor Button
Shasta Daisies
Coneflower
Queen Anne’s Lace

I was happy to see that a lot of the wildlife friendly suggestions from the Canadian Wildlife Federation I had already been practicing, such as collecting rainwater, making and/or using compost and not using harmful chemicals on the grass or plants. Since then I have been working hard to make my outdoor space even better for wildlife. I have installed a “stumpery” which boasts a frog hotel and watering holel! Last fall I cleared a space at the back of my property to put in a wildflower garden for the pollinators and this summer it has been so busy with various bugs and bees. Because bees are attracted to my garden, now more than ever, I find that my zucchini and squashes are producing large yields. Whoohoo! Another thing I have noticed is that while my neighbours are battling pests (in particular the cucumber beetle) my veggies are not facing the same issues. I honestly believe it is because I have so many birds around that they are helping themselves to any harmful pests and bugs (it’s an all you can eat buffet I tell ya).

Black oil Sunflower

So while I watch in horror as my neighbours do their best to rid their property of “pests” such as mice, rabbits, birds, snakes and frogs, I welcome them all to my place with offerings of shelter, water and safe food sources. I kept the long grasses on my hill so that the snakes and small mammals can seek cover and stay cool. We don’t use harmful weed killers to stop the natural growing clover from spreading into our grass. There is still a lot more I want to do keep making our property even better for the wildlife, I am learning more every day and truly enjoying the experience.

Viper’s Bugloss is one of the bees favourite!

Until next time, BEE happy!